Fresno Deputy Sheriff's Association

Representing more than 650 active employees.

Our Mission

The Fresno Deputy Sheriff’s Association was organized in 1973 to give members of the Fresno County Sheriff’s Office the opportunity for fair representation based on the Peace Officer Bill of Rights. The FDSA was also organized to give a group of Deputy Sheriffs the opportunity to collectively bargain with the County of Fresno for wages, benefits, and working conditions.

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Today we honor fallen Fresno County Sheriff’s Deputy Joel Wahlenmaier

Today we honor fallen Fresno County Sheriff’s Deputy Joel Wahlenmaier who was gunned down during the service of a search warrant in the Fresno County town of Minkler, on February 25, 2010.

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Today we honor fallen Fresno County Sheriff’s Deputy Joel Wahlenmaier who was gunned down during the service of a search warrant in the Fresno County town of Minkler, on February 25, 2010.

The Fresno Deputy Sheriffs Association honors each of our fallen deputies who have been killed in the line of duty. Joel worked a variety of assignments during his career with the Sheriff’s Office. Joel was a member of the Fresno County Search and Rescue team, property detective, homicide detective and a great friend and partner to many of us here. Joel’s personality was one of a kind. A stranger one day and a good friend the next. A great way to describe the way Joel was towards people. Great work ethic, loyal, and dedicated – many different ways co-workers described him.

Joel is survived by his wife Bev Wahlenmaier, daughter Amy, son-in-law Hunter and son Austin, along with parents, sister, brother and many other extended family who miss his presence dearly.   

Take the time today as we are at the Fresno Deputy Sheriffs Association to remember our friend Joel Wahlenmaier.  Joel paid the ultimate sacrifice for the citizens of Fresno County. 

We will always honor him and we will never forget him. God Bless

Latest Newsletter

A Message from the President, March 2019

Governor Newsom and the death penalty

Governor Gavin Newsom's recent executive order declaring a moratorium on the death penalty is a test of the boundaries of executive privilege. California Constitution Article 5, Section 1 states, "The supreme executive power of this State is vested in the Governor. The Governor shall see that the law is faithfully enforced." But does the governor have the authority not to enforce laws?